Great Training Day

Wow, what a training day! Pete’s puppies keep surprising us.

Ithaca (Pete x Holly) and her littermates have been impressive from the moment their eyes opened, but this girl is mind blowing. She isn’t ten months old yet and yesterday she was steady to wing, shot and kill without any hesitation or question. She has never worn an e-collar and has never experienced pressure or obedience training, she is the most cooperative and intuitive dog. Brad and I had her in the field with good flying chukar. She was handling beautifully to front, quartering naturally, ranging out but never disconnecting. When she found and pointed her first bird her point was intense and solid. We gave her a moment to see if she was going to work her way up the scent cone as she was about 20 feet from likely cover and the day was super hot and dry, but she was a rock. So I went to front to kick around the cover. As I passed her, she gave me that flash of the eye saying, “you’re on, go get it!”. When the bird ran out of the cover I looked back to see if she was loading up or had changed her intent from holding to helping me flush, but she was still solid! I flushed the bird, checked once more to see that she was still steady and then shot the bird. She was a statue except for her tail 🙂 All of Holly’s and Pete’s puppies are super easy to read, their tails give them away. Brad and I were quiet for a while while continuing the hunt. We had to digest what we had just observed. This nine month old Griffon had just hunted with style and intensity and then been completely steady. He commented that in the many, many dogs that he has trained he can’t remember one so green that so clearly understood its role in the hunt. He said that she had just acted like an eight year old guide dog. It wash’t the fact that she was steady, many of our dogs are steady at this age, it was how clearly she understood her role and how she had no desire to challenge my role or require any extra help in staying steady.

We also worked with Monkey, Honey and Valentine. They are Pete’s and Periwinkle’s puppies and are five months old now. They are also exceptional puppies. Monkey (who now belongs to Scott and Mei) was in the field loose with quail for the first time. He handled super well so we let him work into a bird. When he found and pointed his first bird, Dustin shot it, Monkey hopped once at fall to mark where it landed and I gave him a little growl to remind him to stay still. He was solid on his second bird. Nice shooting Dustin!!

Honey was solid on the Brush Pile and will be practicing what she has learned in the field this week. She was steady to flush, shot and kill and didn’t move a bit while birds were flushing directly over her head. Valentine has another trip to the Brush Pile and will be in the field with her siblings. She ended this session with birds flying overhead and remaining steady to flush, shot and fall.

It is quite amazing to see young Griffons show such keen understanding of their roles in the hunt. It would be impossible without this method of training and this quality of pedigree. The Higgins Method works on the foundation of gregarious predator behavior. It can be used with young, sensitive dogs because it does not use pressure to make a dog comply, rather it gives dogs the incentive to cooperate because they will be successful if they do. We are also using this method to help shape our breeding program. By showing young dogs success with the Brush Pile, we can record their natural tendency to defer to the shooter. A pup who naturally recognizes that their success increases when they defer is one who will try fewer unsuccessful options while learning. A naturally deferring dog tends to be well balanced socially. Selecting natural deferrers in our program is producing puppies like Ithaca, Sophie, Monkey, etc. etc.


About the author
Griffonpoint Kennel, Katy Stuehm. Breeder and trainer working in the Higgins Method since 2007.

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.