Ruger Managing a Running Chukar

Here is Ruger’s first experience learning to manage a running chukar. His job here, as with all running birds, is to manage the bird with just enough pressure to get it to stop, but not so much as to make it flush. If you look closely, you can see the bird running in front of the dog. You can also hear me helping him control his energy. He listens and responds to my timing and the tone of my voice. I don’t use any type of “whoa” training in my program so if Ruger decided to break and try to catch or chase the bird, he is free to do so, and he knows it. He did a great job. He managed the bird carefully and chose to stop at the perfect time (he was not stopped by the dragging check cord). The bird stopped running and held for the shooter. Ruger was then steady to wing and shot. A great example of trust and free will. He knows I’m there to help him make successful decisions. Once the bird was shot, he was released to retrieve (successfully get the bird in his mouth).


Will Honors Glen

Here is a photo taken yesterday while Katie and I were out working the dogs. I often use one of the seasoned dogs to help me train the new pups. In this photo, Glen found a small covey of partridge. Will came around the bush, saw Glen and honored. A bird was shot and the two of them got to share it.

Will is a new pup we received from Des O’neile of Northern Ireland. His Glencuan dogs are exceptionally talented. At this stage, everything Will does in natural, no training involved. All I have done is given him time in the field with birds to hone his natural hunting instincts (predator/prey), shown him how to be successful then, set up natural scenarios for him to practice. He has seen Glen on point before and has run in, flushed the birds and tried to catch them unsuccessfully. His new strategy for success is to honor the pointing dog. He’s learning that steadiness pays off.

Will Honor 2


Shooting Partridge Over Will

Here is our newest pup Will. Special thanks to Des O’Neile, Glencuan Pointers in Northern Ireland.

Will is gaining hunting experience and has been introduced to the gun. Soon, we will begin his steadiness training with the “Magic Brushpile”.

 

 


VIDEO: 6 Month Old Bird Dog

Here is a young dog we recently trained. He is steady to wing, shot and fall. He also stops to flush and has a natural retrieve.

People often ask how we can get such a young dog (6 months old) understanding this level of steadiness and still maintain his natural drive, intensity and focus. The reason is, I don’t use any pressure or obedience in his steadiness training and bird work. My method is success based. He knows that If he cooperates, I’ll help him get the bird in his mouth.

 

Brad Higgins