Olive, Flush/Stop, Retrieve

Here is one of our black pointer pups, Olive, in the field today during one of our training hunts. Here, she finds a bird and waits for us to catch up. Once we arrive, I get the shooter (Reagan) in place and give Olive her Flush/Stop cue. She does a beautiful aggressive flush to present the bird to the guns, but the bird refused to fly. So what does she do? She stops, resets and waits to be cued again. She does a second flush on cue and stops as soon as the bird flies. She is then sent for the retrieve. Dogs are pretty smart if you trust them and give them the freedom to make decisions.


Learning to Manage Birds

VIDEO: Griff Stalk

Here is a young Griffon learning that bird management (stalking) is a necessary and successful strategy. The video starts after the dog scented the bird and pointed. Now the bird has moved off. The dog is learning that to get the bird to stop, it must keep in touch with the bird but not flush it. If the dog does not stalk (too little pressure), the bird will run off and be lost. If the dog moves too fast or tries to get too close (too much pressure), the bird will flush and is lost. It’s a beautiful balancing act to watch. Once the bird set, I sent the shooter out front to shoot the bird and reward the dog for choosing a successful strategy.


VIDEO: Nigel in the Field

Had Nigel (Des x Fizza) out this morning showing off for some prospective owners. Here he is demonstrating steady to wing, shot and fall, waiting for my verbal release to retrieve. In this video, I am filming and the bird flushes behind me.

This is a short clip from a longer video that will be going up on the website this week.

Hope you enjoy it.


Stella Ready for Her New Home

Stella (Basso x Amber) went to her new home today. This video is of her new owners, Therese and Eric, learning to handle her in the field. Stella is steady on her birds until released, does a nice flush/stop on cue and has a natural retrieve. In this video, I’m having Eric and Therese take turns learning to handling Stella and shooting over her.

At this stage, I connect (mentally and physically) the new handler and the dog together with the checkcord for a few sessions. There are a number of new associations that need to be made both for the dog and the handler. The dog needs to associate what he already knows to a new handler including the new voice, new timing, different body movements and cues, etc. The handler needs to learn how to read the dog and learn when to move, when to be still, when to cue the dog, etc.

We had a lot of fun. I’m sure Stella will be happy in her new home. Thank you Therese and Eric.

 

 

 


Here are a couple of our young dogs, Stella and Ekahi, hunting in a cast for the first time. They did well, hunted independently and handled nicely.


Beginning Bracework

Here are William and Nigel in the field this morning. This is their first time together working birds. Before beginning their brace work, both were shown individually, that stalking and steadiness lead to success. Now it’s time to turn them loose and see what choices they make. No voice commands (whoa, etc.), no hand signals, whistles or electric collars are used. I like what I see.


Learning Steadiness From the Birds

Here is a link to a video of a young dog we worked this morning. This is Griffonpoint Z Shaka with her owner Warren. Shaka is now steady until released on birds she has pointed. This scenario was a little different. There was no wind on a warm morning making scent scarce and difficult to work. On these kind of days, dogs often end up much closer to the birds before they can pick up any scent. This makes the birds nervous causing some to flush before the dog has an opportunity to point them. In these conditions, with just a bit of experience, the dogs learn to be very stealthy and careful. In this video, she scents a bird and it begins to run. You can see when she located the scent, she started to decelerate to stop and point but it was too late, the bird flushed (a great bird). She knows that a flushing bird is a cue to stop but she decides to pursue this one. If a dog chases a bird, we don’t reward them by shooting it. We stop the chase and set up a situation where we can reward them for being steady on the next bird. Unlike obedience based training methods, we don’t punish mistakes. We show them how to be successful and allow them the free will to choose the strategy that works best. This is exactly how young pack predators learn to hunt in the wild.

In the video, I don’t use a stop, “down” or “whoa” command. That would be pressure or punishment directly associated to the bird and the flush. I don’t want her building any negative associations to the bird because that can cause a decrease in drive, style or intensity. I simply give her a different command (here) that she clearly understands and is comfortable with in the field, at home and in any situation. In other words, I give her a command that she won’t associated directly to the bird or the hunting scenario. She learns that she is in control. The way she sees it, If she chases, she gives herself a “here” command. No pressure. On the next bird, she was a rock.


Upcoming Higgins Gundogs Shooting Clinics

Higgins Shooting Clinic

Brad’s goal in training hunting dogs is to create a calm, effective, synergistic team that works together. He writes blogs and articles often about training and shooting over fine hunting dogs. Over the years, we have worked with all levels of wingshooters. Some grew up with grandparents or parents who hunted and learned to shoot from an early age, and others (seemingly more and more), decide to learn to shoot so they can best enjoy the sublime relationship earned by hunting with a dog. Because Brad’s main interest in training hunting dogs requires a partner who effectively hits birds (at least some of the time), he has decided to offer shooting clinics for all levels of shooters. He has been an upland bird shooter for more than 40 years and has been successfully teaching amateur hunters to shoot for more than 30 years.

Throughout the clinic, he’ll be using the latest technology including lasers and a ShotKam video recorder. This makes it easy for students to learn, understand and practice, first in the classroom and then outside on real clay targets. Brad’s next shooting clinics have been designed to meet the needs of beginning shooters who may or may not own their own gun, or have limited experience with shotguns.

Saturdays July 28, 2018 and August 4, 2018 have been reserved for our upcoming clinics for Lady Shooters. Additionally, Sundays July 29, 2018 and August 4, 2018 are available for one on one private shooting instruction for those in attendance to the previous day’s clinic.

In order to meet each shooter’s needs, Brad has limited each day of the clinic to three shooters.

The schedule follows:

-8:00 AM Coffee, fruit and pastries

-Indoor Instruction and Practice

  • Understanding Gun fit (length of pull, drop at comb, cast on/cast off)
  • Shotgun Disassembly and reassembly
  • Shotgun Cleaning and maintenance
  • Practicing the gun mount and move (using a barrel laser and projected targets)
  • Creating a consistent sight picture (don’t look down the barrel!)
  • Keeping your eyes on the target while mounting the gun in front
  • Forward allowance (trusting the subconscious to apply lead)
  • Eye dominance

-Lunch


-Out to the Field

  • We’ll practice shooting clay targets with a ShotKam video camera (a high-tech training camera) attached to your shotgun. We record each shot so we can then examine your shots sight picture in slow motion.

-Evaluation of ShotKam videos

  • We’ll head back to the classroom so we can watch actual videos (ShotKam) of your shooting and see why you hit or missed the targets.
  • We’ll discuss your strengths and weaknesses and give you advise on what to work on at home.

-Back to the Field

  • Wingshooting demonstrations with Brad, Katy and Reagan. We’ll end the day shooting live birds over finished Higgins Gundogs.

Cost is $200 per shooter.

Please contact Katy for more information on upcoming dates.

Katy Stuehm

Katy@higginsgundogs.com

916-812-8045


Encouraging a Natural Retrieve

This video shows how we encourage a natural retrieve. It’s natural because I leave the pups free will intact and allow her to choose her options. This is how we build trust and really see a dogs natural talent and abilities.


Proofing a Steady Dog

Higgins Gundogs are trained and managed to a high level. They must be able to adapt to new and unusual situations and control their excitement level. We want to see all their style and intensity, but they must choose to remain steady. Here, we’re proofing a seasoned dog. This is Greg Belanger and his dog HGD Harry. This was filmed a while ago during one of our training hunts. While Harry is managing a moving pheasant, we release a young, untrained pup. The pup goes out and bumps and chases Harry’s bird. What is Harry’s response? He doesn’t break, he manages his energy. He is steady to flush, shot and kill. He is able to do this because he has learned to trust us. He knows, with our help, he will get his bird.